Jim Davidson says Gary Glitter has “remorse” and wants to start a new life

Comedian Jim Davidson said convicted pedophile Gary Glitter had “remorse” and wanted to start a new life.

The former Big Break host has revealed that he recently spoke to the disgraced singer, whose real name is Paul Gadd.

Glitter, 77, is currently serving a 16-year sentence at HMP The Verne in Portland, Dorset, for sex offenses.

He was put behind bars in 2015 for indecent assault on young girls.

The Mirror reports this comic Jim spoke to Dorset Echo as he moored his luxury boat in Weymouth harbor for a two-day break.

The 67-year-old said: “I spoke to Paul when I visited the Verne two years ago. He is remorseful and he seemed ready to start a new life.”

His comments came as he was discussing the charity he co-founded, Care after Combat.

“I’m no longer with the charity, but it’s a great organization that has helped offenders, including those at HMP Portland and Verne,” he said. Echo of Dorset.

“Its main goal is to deal with veterans in the criminal justice system.




Glitter rose to fame in the 1970s as part of the glam rock scene, scoring number one hits with I’m The Leader Of The Gang (I Am), I Love You Love Me Love and Always Yours.

He suffered a dramatic fall from grace in 1999 when he admitted to possessing child pornography and was sentenced to four months in prison.

In 2002, he was deported from Cambodia for unspecified allegations, and in March 2006, he was convicted of sexually abusing two girls, aged 10 and 11, in Vietnam.

In addition to discussing the pop star pedophile, Jim took the time to comment on the recent suspension of England bowler Ollie Robinson due to historical sexist and racist tweets.



Former British Glam-Rocker Gary Glitter in 2006

Speaking of social media posts from 2012 and 2013, Jim said, “The investigation of offensive tweets is ludicrous.

“It’s unfair to dig into the past on someone and flaunt their point of view for something they said at the age of 19. His point of view probably would have changed in the past nine years.

“I think it was probably less talented cricketers who stitched it up,” he added.



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