Experts reveal signs of deception in Gary Glitter



Pedophile singer Gary Glitter has “let go of his guilt” in interviews dating back to 1992 by smiling, swallowing and “freezing” after being asked directly about his relationships with “very young” women, experts in a new analysis.

The disgraced 1970s pop star was jailed for 16 years in 2015 for sexually abusing three young girls between 1975 and 1980, after also serving a sentence in 2006 for assaulting girls in Vietnam.

In a new documentary titled Gary Glitter: A Faking It, airing Saturday on discovery +, experts in forensic psychology, body language, and linguistics analyze television footage filmed throughout Glitter’s career to reveal the telltale signs behind him. have betrayed as a liar and a prolific sex offender.

The footage includes his interview on a car crash in a Vietnamese prison with the BBC in 2006, where experts revealed five signs of guilt and two daytime TV appearances in the 1990s.

INTERVIEW ON THE BIG BREAKFAST IN 1992

During an interview with Paula Yates on The Big Breakfast, she spoke to Glitter about her playboy lifestyle, catching him off guard by asking if the girls he drove to his house are “very young.” Linguistics professor Dawn Archer pointed out features of Glitter’s behavior that suggest anxiety and nerves his secrets would be exposed

During an interview with Paula Yates on The Big Breakfast, she spoke to Glitter about her playboy lifestyle, catching him off guard by asking if the girls he drove to his house are “very young.”

Linguistics professor Dawn Archer pointed out the characteristics of Glitter’s behavior that suggest anxiety and nervousness that her secrets would be exposed: “It’s almost like Paula Yates is inviting this to have different levels of meaning.”

“We have a two second break, they exchanged glances together, then he spoke to her rather than the audience. It’s almost like a game between them.

As the tension builds during the interview, Yates asked Glitter “are they very young?” Struggling to respond, Glitter paused for two seconds as his anxiety increased.

Body language expert Dr Cliff Lansley (pictured) explained:

Body language expert Dr Cliff Lansley (pictured) explained: ‘We have that thousand-yard gaze that we sometimes do when you’re trying to figure out’ how do I get out of it ‘

Body language expert Dr Cliff Lansley explained: “We have that thousand-yard gaze that we sometimes do when you’re trying to figure out” how do I get out of it; how can I get around? ‘

For Archer, this is overwhelming proof of his guilt: “Now we have no doubts; they associate Gary Glitter, for some reason, with young girls, ”she says.

APPEARANCE ON THIS IS YOUR LIFE IN 1992

In a 1992 episode of This is Your Life, Roald Dahl's daughter Tessa recounted how Glitter stayed with his family when he was

In a 1992 episode of This is Your Life, Roald Dahl’s daughter Tessa recounted how Glitter stayed with her family when he was “between jobs” and was often surrounded by schoolgirls who paid £ 5 for the job. “to concern”. Body language expert Dr Cliff Lansley said his forced smile was an indicator suggesting anxiety about the truth.

In a 1992 episode of This is Your Life, Roald Dahl’s daughter Tessa recounted how Glitter stayed with her family when he was “between jobs” and was often surrounded by schoolgirls who paid £ 5 for the job. “to concern”.

Body language expert Dr Cliff Lansley identified clues in Glitter’s behavior suggesting anxiety about the truth.

“As soon as she brings up the subject, her Adam’s apple pops up as he swallows at the prospect of how far she’s going to go with this story.” And we are hot under the collar, pulling the scarf away from the throat, ”he explains.

Linguistics professor Dawn Archer (pictured) pointed out features of Glitter's behavior that suggest anxiety and nerves his secrets would be exposed

Linguistics professor Dawn Archer (pictured) pointed out features of Glitter’s behavior that suggest anxiety and nerves his secrets would be exposed

“If we zoom in close, where the muscle that pulls the lip sideways towards the jaw, which only activates when we show fear. And if you look closely here, the lips aren’t pulled up in a smile, but to the side in a micro expression of fear.

In the interview, Glitter attempted to mask his fear with a forced smile. Cliff continued, “Expressing fear is inferior to consciousness, and it’s hard to do.

“But one of the easiest things to do is smile. So by moving those corners of the lips up. And that tension that that creates in the face can mask and cover the emotion that people really feel. It’s a fake smile.

INTERVIEW WITH BBC FROM INSIDE VIETNAMESE PRISON

In May 2006, Glitter attempted to convince the world of his innocence by speaking to the BBC from inside the prison.  Lansley said his raised eyebrows, wide eyes and open mouth were a sign of guilt

In May 2006, Glitter attempted to convince the world of his innocence by speaking to the BBC from inside the prison. Lansley said his raised eyebrows, wide eyes and open mouth were a sign of guilt

But Glitter’s most telling moments came after his initial conviction for possession of child pornography in 1999. Fleeing Britain after his conviction, Glitter was again arrested in 2005 for child sex offenses in Vietnam.

In May 2006, Glitter attempted to convince the world of his innocence by speaking to the BBC from inside the prison. When asked if he had ever slept with an underage girl, Glitter replied “not to my knowledge”.

Lansley said: “He shakes his hands together. This is what happens when we experience fear or anxiety. You see his right fingers gripping the back of his left hand. We see a slight increase in his left shoulder.

“To its full extent, a shrug is usually the shoulders up and the hands with the palms facing out. It means “I have no idea what I’m talking about”.

A rise in Glitter’s voice also underscores his deception, Cliff explaining, “When we contract with anxiety, it tightens the muscles around the larynx and throat, and it can raise our voice.”

Archer said that Glitter’s speech patterns are also tell-tale signs of deception: “We have flow and stuttering issues and a false start.

‘We have’ I don’t believe ‘which is a qualifier and it’s not the same as saying’ I definitely don’t believe it ‘. It tends to be done more by people who try to deceive because they tend to fall into belief mode; they want to convince us that they are telling us the truth and therefore become more adamant. ‘

During the interview with the BBC about the car accident, Glitter denied the allegations, commenting “I know the line to be crossed”.

Glitter is pictured inside a Vietnamese prison in 2006. Dr Lansley said that a muscle pulls the lip sideways towards the jaw when we feel fear and this can often turn into a smile

Glitter is pictured inside a Vietnamese prison in 2006. Dr Lansley said that a muscle pulls the lip sideways towards the jaw when we feel fear and this can often turn into a smile

Picking up on this error, the interviewer opts for the jugular, challenging Glitter’s pleas of innocence. Paralyzed with fear, Glitter pauses for five seconds.

Lansley explained the five gestures that signal the grim truth: he is guilty. “You have raised eyebrows, wide eyes and an open mouth.

“We push back the head and the body. When we are attacked and fearful, we move away from the threat. His eyes close, his mouth closes, and then he licks his lips, which signals the level of anxiety.

“This anxiety will dry out the mouth, and the way to compensate for a dry mouth is to swallow or lick your lips. If he was on a polygraph right now, his heart would be beating at 120 beats per minute, his blood pressure would be high, and his palms would likely be quite sweaty. Gary Glitter is paralyzed with fear and it lasts five seconds.

When asked what his response would be to seeing someone in a similar position – a middle-aged man charged with child sex crimes – Glitter stammered in his response.

“He’s having a hard time getting the words out,” Lansley said. “We get this meander and in the middle we get another frozen response where it almost sticks like a broken record.

Examining Glitter’s speech, Dawn Archer pointed out five other moments of interest in her 10-second response, indicating her lack of confidence to cover up her guilt.

“We have speed problems. He starts off with a false start – “I would” – then he goes on to say, “Well that would definitely be a crime,” she said.

“And then we have a two second pause, and we have a lot of ‘uh, uh, uh,’ which is another indicator of flow issues. And there’s another false start. Then there’s an omission.” I ”, where he says:“ I don’t have the words ”.

Gary Glitter: A Faking It Special is available to stream from Saturday, September 25 exclusively on discovery +


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